Norton Commons Winter 2018 Magazine

Flip through our latest publication and get information on upcoming events, new homes for sale, our independently-owned businesses, and even coupons to use in Norton Commons!

Norton Commons Announces North Village Market

Growing new urbanist community to open innovative retail, food and beverage retail cottages to incubate and cultivate rising local designers and chefs

Photo courtesy of Norton Commons

PROSPECT, KY (June 4, 2018) – Norton Commons, the growing new urbanist development in Prospect, KY today announced the community has broken ground on a new market in its North Village aimed at incubating local food and retailers.  The open-air North Village Market is located at 6301 Moonseed Street, just a stone’s throw from the lakefront amphitheater, and will include six retail cottages. Norton Commons expects to complete the project in mid-July.

In a unique arrangement, Norton Commons is offering shorter-term agreements than most typical retail and restaurant space leases. Instead of traditional retail terms, Norton Commons will collect a percent of gross sales, allowing for more flexibility and creativity for up-and-coming makers, chefs, merchants and artisans.

“We’ve taken a good bit of inspiration from another New Urbanist community, Seaside, FL, which has had great success with this model,” said Charles Osborn III, Managing Director of Norton Commons.    “It’s been a win-win for the community and also for the entrepreneurs seeking a launching pad or to test a new offering or location.”

Photo of Seaside market courtesy of SoWal

Already three businesses have signed agreements at the North Village Market, including BLU Boutique as well as children’s boutique, Rabbit in the Moon, both of which are opening second locations, and  Spark Boutique, a women’s apparel and accessories store.  “It’s been an overwhelming response just through a little word of mouth,” said Osborn III.  “I’m glad we have the flexibility to add a few more cottages if needed.  We’re excited about farmers markets, musical performances and some great pop-up stores.”

Norton Commons consulted on the project with the celebrated planner and landscape architect Robert Gibbs, who has been profiled the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Atlantic, and is a leader in New Urbanism.

In April, Norton Commons announced plans to construct unique new amenities in the community’s North Village including preliminary drawings for “The Grove”, a 2.5-acre ridgetop recreational area, complete with a zero-entry, lagoon-style pool and splash park, playground, walking trails and a lush sunset viewing green. Additionally, developers unveiled plans for “Peppermint Green,” a football field-sized civic space and green abutted by a covered breezeway replete with columns in the classical vernacular style.

Norton Commons broke ground on the North Village in 2015 and recently completed its 200th home in that section.  When completed, Norton Commons’ North Village will stand at over 1500 homes.

Construction began in the Norton Commons South Village in 2003.  The walkable mixed-use development includes over 65 business, the overwhelming majority of which are independent, including dozens of small shops, professional services, and specialty boutiques.  Norton Commons also has a much-talked-about independent food scene, with nationally-recognized chefs serving up unique dishes from Latin street food fusion, to casual Italian trattoria and southern comfort food.

Sabak Wilson is site designer and engineer for the North Village Market, which will be a total of 12,000 square feet.

Media inquiries should be directed to Tyler Glick: tyler@glickstrategies.com
502-500-3286

About Norton Commons: Norton Commons is Louisville’s first Traditional Neighborhood Development (“TND”).  Planned TNDs are the cornerstone of the new urbanism movement, which promotes the creation and restoration of diverse, walkable, and vibrant mixed-use communities assembled in an integrated fashion, resulting in a complete community.  Norton Commons sits on almost 600 acres in northeast Jefferson County, Kentucky and is currently home to over 1200 residences, 60+ businesses, 3 schools, and dozens of parks, pools, and green spaces. To learn more about Norton Commons, visit nortoncommons.com or on Twitter @nortoncommonsky.

 

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Norton Commons Summer 2018 Magazine

Flip through our latest publication and get information on upcoming events, new homes for sale, our independently-owned businesses, and even coupons to use in Norton Commons all summer long!

Celebrating the Track, Off the Beaten Track

Whether preparing for a big day at the races or celebrating the win (or loss) with dinner and drinks, locals and visitors alike are invited to make Norton Commons their one-stop destination for Derby festivities. Located in northeast Louisville, the walkable new urbanist neighborhood is pulling out all the stops to make this Derby one to remember.

With several independent clothing boutiques, including The Hat Girls, official hat designers of the Kentucky Derby Festival, Norton Commons’ shops have everything you need to look the part at the track from head to toe. Derby dresses, custom headwear, accessories, jewelry and even men’s wear can all be found at the neighborhood’s unique retailers. And independent ownership means that the service is just as pleasant as the selection. What other reason could you need to skip the mall crowds and shop local? For a full rundown of spring fashion options in the community, check out this video.

Derby attire aside, one can’t celebrate the world’s most famous horse race without a good bourbon in hand. Accordingly, Commonwealth Tap, voted the city’s best wine and bourbon bar, is a must-see for every race reveler. The Tap’s co-founder Kenny Andreozzi is not only a certified sommelier but is an expert bourbon aficionado to boot. Tap’s selection includes over 250 bottles of bourbon including tried-and-true favorites as well as hard-to-find and rare labels. Kenny and his knowledgeable staff will be pouring cocktails from their vast selection and making recommendations about Kentucky’s drink of choice throughout Derby season.

If eats are what you’re after, Norton Commons has 10 locally-owned restaurants offering everything from Southern staples to Asian fusion to Italian cuisine and beyond. Several of its award-winning spots have ample patios for dining al fresco, and all are within easy walking distance of one another. With plans for specialty menus, live music, and unique crafted cocktails, each restaurant will offer something special for Derby. And don’t forget about boxed lunches for the track, available at Bluegrass Exchange May 3-5.

No matter if you’re a Louisville local or just stopping through for the big race, Derby is the perfect opportunity to visit Louisville’s most unique walkable community, Norton Commons.

For a list of our 60+ businesses, click here.

Need directions? Situated in northeast Louisville just 13 miles from downtown, getting here is easy peasy. Check out directions here. Or enter 9418 Norton Commons Blvd., Prospect, KY 40059 into your GPS.

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Norton Commons style: Community offers Derby delights for locals and visitors alike

Derby hat from The Hat Girls

Derby fever is here. For Norton Commons residents, Louisville locals and visitors alike, Norton Commons is a place to check all the boxes for the ultimate Derby experience. Within walking or short driving distance is your entrée to horses, bourbon, specialty cuisine, boutiques for dresses, hats and accessories and Derby festival events perfect for families or just friends.

Big hats and bright dresses

After four years designing custom Derby hats for their clients from a basement, The Hat Girls’ owners Rachel Bell and Kate Smith moved to Norton Commons in 2017. Originally a pop-up concept, the pair saw their storefront business double last year and decided to stay on as a year-round establishment.

During this year’s Derby season, The Hat Girls, who are the official hat designers for the Kentucky Derby Festival, said they will create and design about 500 hats.

Bell and her partner Smith said they spend a lot of time with each customer finding the perfect hat for her individual personality and comfort level. “If a woman has a loud personality, she might be more comfortable in one of our louder creations, but on the other hand, she may just want to blend in. It’s like a wedding dress. A lot of times as soon as you put it on, you know that’s the one,” she said.

What is trending for Derby season 2018? “Fascinators continue to get bigger every single year,” said Bell. “They are more comfortable, and don’t give you ‘hat head or hat hair.’” The stylist said fascinators can also fit any age demographic.

This year’s hot hat colors include traditional Oaks pink but also a couple new additions like Breeder’s Cup purple, and surprisingly, kelly green, said Bell.

Breanne Hafling at her boutique Something Blue

Breanne Hafling, owner of the boutique Something Blue, said she sees maxi dresses trending this year, and the good news is they are loose and flowing, perfect for those long days at Derby Festival events or at the track. “Fashion first, of course, but maybe comfort a close second.”

Hafling, whose boutique just celebrated eight years in business, said she focuses on “a boutique feel” for an affordable price point. I don’t think there is a dress here over $60, and our most expensive fascinator is $70,” she said.

Eat, drink bourbon and be merry

Kenny Andreozzi, proprietor of Commonwealth Tap Wine and Whiskey Bar, said Norton Commons does a great job extending southern hospitality to visitors and regulars alike. The bar, which will celebrate five years in 2018, will open its doors early on Oaks and Derby to serve up Bloody Marys to racetrack-bound patrons, said Andreozzi.

For the bar owner, though, it’s all about the bourbon, namely Old Forester and Woodford Reserve, the two official Kentucky Derby bourbons. “If your feet are on the Bluegrass, you just have to try bourbon, even if you don’t think you like it,” said Andreozzi. “We make a great mint julep with simple syrup that we serve in an old Derby class from the 70s or 80s,” he said.

A handful of other Derby-themed specialty cocktails will also be available during Derby season, including Andreozzi’s favorite, the Kentucky Colonel, a concoction of Rittenhouse rye whiskey and Benedictine. Not to be confused with delicious cucumber cream cheese sandwiches, this Benedictine is a 19th century French liqueur.

Down the street from Commonwealth Tap, Chef Ming Pu, of 502 Bar and Bistro, is prepping the final touches for the restaurant’s prix fixe Oaks and Derby menu, as well as the new Spring menu. Owner Scott Cheatham, who recommends the bone-in pork chop on a bed of succotash from the new menu, said his award-winning chef makes everything from scratch. For Derby guests, Cheatham offers a versatile casual upscale cuisine and niche. “For families, kids can be their messy selves while on the other side of the house, we have a more romantic scene, with a nice wine list, for date night.”

As one of the official stops of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, Chateau Bourbon at Norton Commons definitely has the 4-1-1 on the designated “spirit” of Derby. For bed and breakfast owner Missy Hillock, bourbon is her specialty year-round as her guests are treated to a bourbon happy hour specialty cocktail as part of their stay. Special flourishes for Derby however include red roses in every room, not to mention Hillock’s signature mint julep cupcakes and mint julep ice cream, as well as the iconic drink itself. Her variation features blackberry simple syrup.

And the horses, of course …

For horse lovers, Churchill Downs is a short gallop from Norton Commons. For guests who want a closer look, though, said Hillock, they needn’t travel to Lexington or Versailles for their thoroughbred fix. Ten minutes away in Crestwood, visitors can enjoy a hands-on tour of retired racehorses at horse farm, Old Friends.

Norton Commons is Kentucky’s first and only Traditional Neighborhood Development (“TND”). Planned TNDs are the cornerstone of the new urbanism movement, which promotes the creation of diverse, walkable, and vibrant mixed-use communities assembled in an integrated fashion, resulting in a complete community. Norton Commons sits on almost 600 acres in northeast Jefferson County, and is currently home to over 1000 residences, 60+ businesses, 3 schools, and dozens of parks, pools and green spaces.

 

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Norton Commons Releases Plans for North Village Amenities

Zero-entry lagoon pool, splash park, and sunset pavilion and lawn to be completed in May of 2019

Norton Commons, the growing new urbanist development in Prospect, KY today announced plans to construct unique new amenities in the community’s North Village. Developers released preliminary drawings for “The Grove”, a 2.5-acre ridgetop recreational area, complete with a zero-entry, lagoon-style pool and splash park, playground, walking trails and a lush sunset viewing green.

Developers plan to break ground on the Grove in fall 2018 with an estimated completion date before the 2019 pool season. The Grove will also include significant woodland and watershed protection areas.

In addition, Norton Commons unveiled renderings for an almost football field-sized civic space dubbed “Peppermint Green,” to be situated between Passionflower Drive and Saint Bernadette Avenue, just north of Emerald Park. The extensive green will be surrounded by a walking path and encircled by large, native species trees. The design is a nod to Old Louisville, complete with a walk punctuated with spaces for benches and urns filled with flowers. The southern edge will be abutted by a covered breezeway replete with columns in the classical vernacular style.

In keeping with Norton Commons’ record of adding more than 2700 native trees to the environment to date, the community will be adding approximately new 100 trees between the two new amenity areas.

“Norton Commons is thrilled to continue to engage in one-of-a-kind placemaking,” said Managing Director, Charles Osborn III. “We’re all about walkable, mixed-usage, with an eye toward the future, but never forgetting Louisville’s unique roots and history.”

The new amenities will be unveiled to the public during the “Welcome Home Tour & Design Show,”to be held May 25 to Jun. 9, 2019.  The home show will include a dozen unique geothermal houses furnished in luxurious styles.

The Grove and Peppermint Green will be part of nearly 160 acres of planned green and civic spaces across the North and South Villages, and which already include miles of nature trails, a rose garden, a lakefront amphitheater, three dog parks, a community vegetable garden, wildflower meadow and two pool facilities.

Norton Commons broke ground on its new North Village in 2015 and recently completed its 200th home in that section. When completed, Norton Commons’ North Village will stand at over 1500 residences, and will be one of the largest residential all-geothermal communities in the nation.

Geothermal technology takes advantage of moderate ground temperatures to create an efficient system that lowers monthly utility bills while emitting less carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Geothermal heating and cooling eliminates the need for outdoor air conditioning units and reduces noise, while allowing for more space for residents to enjoy the outdoors. A network of underground geothermal loops and efficiently-sized heat pump units inside each home provide homeowners with the most comfortable heating and cooling systems available on the market today.

Disclaimer: Please note that plans for the North Village amenities are preliminary and subject to change at any time without notice.

For press inquiries contact Tyler Glick502-500-3286

About Norton Commons:

Norton Commons is Louisville’s first Traditional Neighborhood Development (“TND”).  Planned TNDs are the cornerstone of the new urbanism movement, which promotes the creation and restoration of diverse, walkable, and vibrant mixed-use communities assembled in an integrated fashion, resulting in a complete community.  Norton Commons sits on almost 600 acres in northeast Jefferson County, Kentucky and is currently home to over 1200 residences, 60+ businesses, 3 schools, and dozens of parks, pools, and green spaces. To learn more about Norton Commons, visit nortoncommons.com or on Twitter @nortoncommonsky.

 

 

 

 

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Norton Commons Hits Milestone in Effort to Build Nation’s Largest 100 Percent Geothermal Community

Development completes 200th home

PROSPECT, Ky. (March 15, 2018)— It’s full steam ahead (quite literally) for Norton Commons, the growing New Urbanist development in northeast Louisville, as the community charges forward with its mission to create one of the largest all geothermal communities in the nation. 200 homes in the community’s North Village are now heated and cooled using state-of-the-art technology which harnesses energy produced beneath the earth’s surface.

Another 50 geothermal homes are currently under construction and 50 are in planning stages. When completed, Norton Commons’ North Village will stand at over 1500, and will be one of the largest residential all geothermal communities in the nation, alongside innovative developments like Whisper Valley in Austin, TX and Pinewood Forest in Fayetteville, GA.  Norton Commons completed the North Village’s first geothermal home in Dec. of 2015.

Geothermal technology takes advantage of moderate ground temperatures to create an efficient system that lowers monthly utility bills while emitting less carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Geothermal heating and cooling eliminates the need for outdoor air conditioning units and reduces noise, while allowing for more space for residents to enjoy the outdoors. A network of underground geothermal loops and efficiently-sized heat pump units inside each home provide homeowners with the most comfortable heating and cooling systems available on the market today.

“Geothermal has been a huge hit. It offers energy savings and brings additional home comfort to residents,” said Norton Commons managing director, Charles A. Osborn III. “It’s all part of our purposeful design, which includes 160 acres of planned green and civic spaces, miles of nature trails, a rose garden as well as our community vegetable garden and wildflower meadow.”

The federal budget deal that passed last month brought good news for geothermal homeowners and homebuyers. The Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit, which expired at the end of 2016, was reinstated and extended by the new deal after it was signed into law by the President.  A tax credit means a dollar-for-dollar reduction of tax liability for units put into service after Jan. 1, 2017, through 2021.

Norton Commons Elementary in the North Village, the first new-build school for Jefferson County Public Schools since 2008, incorporates eco-friendly geothermal heating and cooling as well as other eco-friendly features like solar-heated water, a reflective white roof and LED lights with motion sensors.

For further details visit: nortoncommons.com.

*For video, feel free to use this great drone footage*

About Norton Commons:

Norton Commons is Louisville’s first Traditional Neighborhood Development (“TND”).  Planned TNDs are the cornerstone of the new urbanism movement, which promotes the creation and restoration of diverse, walkable, and vibrant mixed-use communities assembled in an integrated fashion, resulting in a complete community.  Norton Commons sits on almost 600 acres in northeast Jefferson County, Kentucky and is currently home to over 1200 residences, 60+ businesses, 3 schools, and dozens of parks, pools, and green spaces. To learn more about Norton Commons, visit nortoncommons.com or on Twitter @nortoncommonsky.

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Great News for Homeowners: Geothermal Tax Credits Reinstated

The budget deal that passed on February 9, 2018, was good news for homeowners who purchased a geothermal system after January 1, 2017. The Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit, which expired at the end of 2016, was reinstated and extended by the new deal after it was signed into law by President Donald Trump. Some sources report that the Renewable Energy Trade Organization and other groups lobbied Congress for almost two years to get the credit reinstated.

The federal geothermal tax credit of 30% of the cost of a residential system was extended and made retroactive to purchases in 2017. This means homeowners who installed geothermal systems can see the tax savings on their 2017 tax return. Homeowners who already filed their 2017 return can amend the return to realize the tax savings. A tax credit means a dollar-for-dollar reduction of tax liability for units put into service after January, 1, 2017, through 2019. The credit drops to 26% for 2020 and 22% for 2021.

With new home construction booming in Norton Commons, this is exciting news for builders and home buyers. Norton Commons’ geothermal initiative is one of the largest in the nation and reflects Norton Commons’ commitment to the environment. Homes in the North Village are heated and cooled with geothermal technology which takes advantage of moderate ground temperatures to create an efficient system that lowers monthly utility bills without emitting carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. In addition, geothermal equipment generally lasts longer than a traditional furnace and typically requires less maintenance overall.

Geothermal systems result in another distinct advantage for Norton Commons’ homeowners—no outside air conditioning units. Homeowners in Norton Commons can enjoy outdoor living spaces, such as porches and courtyards, without the noise from outside units.

Noise reduction, energy efficiency, lower utility bills, and now a 30% tax credit means great news for Norton Commons’ residents.

 

To learn read more about the Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit, follow these links:

Victory for the Geothermal Heat Pump Industry

https://www.forbes.com/sites/ashleaebeling/2018/02/09/budget-deal-revives-expired-individual-tax-breaks-for-homeowners-students-and-environmentalists/#4c753f807452

Forecasted Home Trends for 2018

Posted on by Norton Commons

This gallery contains 5 photos.

Photo courtesy of Gretchen Black of Greyhouse Design 2017 was an interesting year for home building and décor trends. With the wide popularity of websites like Houzz and Pinterest, many homeowners have taken to DIY or at least want a stronger voice in decisions regarding home design. Wood walls called “shiplap” became one of the […]

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